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How Harrods is fixing the perfume pollution in their store

If you want something special, you should have the right olfactory space. That brings us back to perfume counter problem, & what British dept store Harrods is doing to fix it.

Bloomberg|
Updated: Jul 25, 2014, 02.43 PM IST
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If you want something special, you should have the right olfactory space. That brings us back to the perfume counter problem, and what the Briti sh department store Harrods is doing to fix it.
If you want something special, you should have the right olfactory space. That brings us back to the perfume counter problem, and what the Briti sh department store Harrods is doing to fix it.
Your department store fragrance floor has a problem. There are simply too many people trying on too many scents. "Everyone just sprays the perfume around," says Emmanuelle Pages, a fragrance consultant based in Hamburg, Germany. "There's no way to neutralise each fragrance, so there's no way for the customer to smell any one thing."

It's not so bad if you're looking for an established perfume like Chanel no 5 or the ubiquitous Odeur 53 from Comme de Garcons: You know where to find it, and what it smells like. But you're out of luck if you want something more unique, which, lately, is exactly what people seem to be after.

"There used to be independent perfumeries where you'd buy upscale perfumes, and retailers would carry mainstream fragrances," says Marian Bendeth, a fragrance consultant based in Toronto. "Then retailers began to take on brands that are more niche and expensive."

So if you want something special, you should have the right olfactory space. That brings us back to the perfume counter problem, and what the British department store Harrods is doing to fix it.

Alcove Appeal First, they are pulling their best perfumes from the makeup-oriented beauty hall altogether. Then they're building a separate, 'Salon de Parfums' on their sixth floor, where buyers will be able to wander through hushed marble halls and sample perfu mes from 11 stores, each in its own alcove.

Brands include Roja Dove, the celebrated bespoke perfumer and Clive Christian, who has 'the world's most expensive perfume' written on his bottles. The 5,090-sqft space will have neutral coloured walls, crystal chandeliers and a domed glass ceiling. Harrods is only catching up.

Frederic Malle, the famed French perfumer, has special 'smelling columns' where shoppers can test each scent in a totally neutral space. Le Labo has glass domes over their candles, so that patrons can uncover them to breathe in an unadulterated scent.
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