Never miss a great news story!
Get instant notifications from Economic Times
AllowNot now


You can switch off notifications anytime using browser settings.
11,921.50-96.9
Stock Analysis, IPO, Mutual Funds, Bonds & More

Cheers to heart health: Eating this bacteria may reduce risk of cardiovascular disease

The use of a pasteurised form of Akkermansia muciniphila - an intestinal bacteria - can keep heart healthy.

IANS|
Jul 03, 2019, 07.51 AM IST
0Comments
Getty Images
heart-attack_GettyImages
Akkermansia muciniphila works as a nutritional supplement.
LONDON: Researchers have discovered that the use of a pasteurised form of Akkermansia muciniphila-an intestinal bacteria provides greater protection from various cardiovascular disease risk factors.

According to the findings published in the journal Nature Medicine, the research team from the University of Louvain developed a clinical study in order to administer the bacteria to humans.

For the study, 40 participants were enrolled and 32 completed the trial. The researchers administered Akkermansia to overweight or obese participants, all displaying insulin resistance (pre-diabetes type 2) and metabolic syndrome, in other words, having several elevated risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

The participants were randomly divided into three groups -- placebo group, those taking live bacteria and those taking pasteurised bacteria -- and were asked not to change their dietary habits or their physical activity. Akkermansia was provided as a nutritional supplement.

Heartburn Troubles? Foods To Ease The Problem And Make Gut Feel Good

of 9
Next
Prev
Play Slideshow

Ease Your Heartburn

13 Feb, 2018
Heartburn can strike anyone, but it usually happens to those who are obese and eat big and untimely meals. From coffee to chocolate, everything you eat may make heartburn worse. But there are also foods that can ease your heartburn. Here are some of them for you by Ayush Rekha:
Next

The primary goal of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility of ingesting Akkermansia daily for three months, without risk.

The researchers observed excellent compliance - the supplements were easy to ingest and there were no side effects in the groups taking live or pasteurised bacteria.

According to the study, the tests in humans confirm what had already been observed in mice. Ingestion of the (pasteurised) bacterium prevented the deterioration of the health status of the subjects (pre-diabetes, cardiovascular risks).

Even better, the researchers observed a decrease in inflammation markers in the liver, a slight decrease in the body weight of the subjects (2.3 kg on average) as well as a lowering of cholesterol levels.

In contrast, the metabolic parameters (insulin resistance or hypercholesterolemia) in placebo subjects continued to deteriorate over time.

This research would limit cardiovascular risks and therefore potentially have an impact on half of the population, if properly used, researchers said.

Cut Down On Salt, Drink Fluids: Simple Diet Tips To Avoid Chronic Heart Failure

of 5
Next
Prev
Play Slideshow

Save Your Heart

29 Sep, 2018
Cardiac or heart failure is a clinical condition in which the heart loses the ability to eject blood to meet the requirements of the tissues of the body. Irrespective of the cause, nutritional concerns need to be addressed in this condition in order to prevent morbidity and mortality. Patients with chronic heart failure are at constant risk of losing weight due to the medical condition and also low dietary intake which is due poor appetite, depression or loss of appetite due to consumption of drugs.Dietary interventions to maintain and restore the nutritional balance are essential part of treatment therapy. These include a suitable change in calorie intake, reduction in sodium and fluid intake, maintenance of potassium and magnesium in the body, and appropriate supplementation with vitamins and minerals.Here are some simple tips by Dr Ritika Samaddar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Hospital, Saket.
Next

Want stories like this in your inbox? Sign up for the daily ET Panache newsletter.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Also Read

Switch to plant-based diet for better heart health and to lower risk of death

Keep heart health in check: 'Ugly cholesterol' can increase risk of stroke

A six-minute walking test may not be that accurate, your smartwatch can analyse heart health better

Rely too much on dietary supplements? Stop now, it may impact heart health

Myth busted: Consuming even as many as 25 cups of coffee a day may not hurt heart health

Comments
Add Your Comments
Commenting feature is disabled in your country/region.
Download The Economic Times Business News App for the Latest News in Business, Sensex, Stock Market Updates & More.

Other useful Links


Follow us on


Download et app


Copyright © 2019 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service