Out Of This World: The Many Ways You Can Explore Outer Space Without Being An Astronaut

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Race To Outer Space
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Race To Outer Space

When Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa announced earlier this week that he wanted a companion to accompany him on a voyage to the Moon, it marked just the latest instance that an ordinary citizen could conceivably fly to outer space.

There have been a few private citizens before him who have expressed a desire to indulge in a spot of space tourism, while a few enterprising organisations also offer the same deal to people willing to pay top dollar. Here are all the ways one can go into outer space without actually being an astronaut.

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Wait For The Next DiCaprio Auction
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Wait For The Next DiCaprio Auction

Among the celebrities who have purchased tickets for the first flight into outer space was Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio. And to sweeten the deal further, he auctioned the seat next to his, with the proceeds going to charity. But since that seat is already gone, others can just wait for the next one.

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Be Very Rich
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Be Very Rich

Many companies like Virgin Galactic, SpaceX and Blue Origin have invested heavily in outer space, and they have even opened up slots to people. The only catch: These slots don’t come cheap. An out-of-this-world trip could cost seven-digit amounts. But what’s even more uncertain is the time frame. Impatient types may try other options.

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In The Afterlife
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In The Afterlife

Unfortunately, a very real fear is that space tourism will not become a viable reality within our lifetime. Fear not. One space robotics company, Astrobotic Technology, has planned a lunar memorial service for paying customers, whereby they can send the ashes of their loved ones to the Moon. The term “love you to the Moon” will just not have the same impact once this takes off.

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Almost There
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Almost There

Technically speaking, outer space begins at 100 kilometres above the surface of the Earth, what’s known as the Kármán line. There are, however, startups that take you to one part of the journey.

The US-based World View Enterprises, for instance, will take you to an altitude of 30 kilometres, enough to acknowledge the vastness of the universe and marvel at its blackness. And isn’t that what space tourism is all about, after all?

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