Never miss a great news story!
Get instant notifications from Economic Times
AllowNot now


You can switch off notifications anytime using browser settings.
11,921.50-96.9
Stock Analysis, IPO, Mutual Funds, Bonds & More

When music met tech: Japan uses song co-created by AI to welcome Pope Francis

Producer-composer Inoue shares composing credit with 'Amadeus Code AI'.

Reuters|
Nov 20, 2019, 12.01 PM IST
0Comments
Reuters
Untitled-3
The song, 'Protect all Life - The Signs of the Times', is based on the theme of the Pope's Japan visit.
TOKYO: Few aspects of life escape the touch of high tech in cutting-edge Japan, including an official song written to welcome Pope Francis when he visits Japan from Saturday.

Written by Jun Inoue, the song, 'Protect all Life - The Signs of the Times', is based on the theme of the Pope's Japan visit and was partly composed using an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered programme Inoue created that can write a piece of music in a few seconds.

Inoue, a producer and composer who has written for top bands such as Arashi, and is Catholic, said he agonised over using the AI programme but finally decided to include it because the history of music and technology were intertwined.

"I thought I should give everything I had to the song, so I decided to put in all the cutting-edge technology I had," he told Reuters. He shares composing credit with 'Amadeus Code AI'.

​Inoue said he agonised over using the AI programme but finally decided to include it because the history of music and technology were intertwined.​
Inoue said he agonised over using the AI programme but finally decided to include it because the history of music and technology were intertwined.

The song, which was written at the behest of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of Japan, will be played at masses in the city of Nagasaki as well as Tokyo and comes in several versions, including instrumental and karaoke.

There are also dance steps and stylised hand gestures that are the Japanese sign language version of the lyrics, with a teaching video posted on the official website for the pope's visit. Inoue hopes worshippers at the public masses, to be held at stadiums, will sing and dance along with the song.

While the footwork is simple, consisting of side-to-side steps in time to the music, the sign language may take a bit more time to master.

"There are a lot of people who live in a world without sound, and I would like them too to understand the meaning of the lyrics and the message," Inoue said.

Theme songs for papal visits have been composed before. One has been unveiled for Thailand, where Francis will visit before Japan.

His visit from Nov. 23-26, which will also include Hiroshima, is only the second papal visit to Japan and the first since John Paul II 38 years ago.

Next Horizon Of Science: AI To Diagnose Brain Haemorrhage, Spacecraft For Intergalactic Tra...

of 6
Next
Prev
Play Slideshow

Tech Surprises

7 Sep, 2018
From AI that can diagnose stroke to scientists taking antimatter for a truck ride, here’s everything exciting about technologies that are going to shape our future. (Text: Rajarshi Bhattacharjee)
Next

Want stories like this in your inbox? Sign up for the daily ET Panache newsletter.

You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Also Read

Stock market is on a song; what should mutual fund investors do?

The Obamas spent summer listening to these songs; how many made it to your playlist?

Rahman teams up with U2 for new song ahead of band's maiden India visit

Badluram ka Badan: The fascinating Assam Regiment song and the story behind it

Comments
Add Your Comments
Commenting feature is disabled in your country/region.
Download The Economic Times Business News App for the Latest News in Business, Sensex, Stock Market Updates & More.

Other useful Links


Follow us on


Download et app


Copyright © 2019 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service