Never miss a great news story!
Get instant notifications from Economic Times
AllowNot now


You can switch off notifications anytime using browser settings.
11,699.65-24.45
Stock Analysis, IPO, Mutual Funds, Bonds & More

Terror groups may be recruiting more women to wage jihad: Study

A study published on Monday by the North Carolina State University in the US found significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups.

PTI|
May 01, 2019, 05.30 PM IST
0Comments
BCCL
Terror groups may be recruiting more women to wage jihad: Study
The research also highlighted different roles for women in terrorist action.
WASHINGTON: Terror groups may be increasingly recruiting women, data from the first large-scale research project evaluating the characteristics of women involved in jihadism-inspired terrorism has found, days after Sri Lanka witnessed the country's worst terror attack.

A woman was part of the nine suicide bombers in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday and intelligence officials say more women posing as devotees were planning to carry our terror attacks on Buddhist temples in the island nation.

A study published on Monday by the North Carolina State University in the US found significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups.

For the study, researchers drew on data from the Western Jihadism Project, based at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts, which collects data on terrorists associated with Al-Qaeda-inspired organisations.

The researchers conducted comparative analyses of 272 women and 266 men, who were matched to control for variables such as ethnicity, nation of residence and age at radicalisation.

There were significant differences in background for men and women. For example, only 2 per cent of women had a criminal background before radicalisation, compared to 19 per cent of men.

While about 14 per cent of men had no profession in the six months preceding their affiliation with a terrorist group, almost 42 per cent of women were unemployed during the same timeframe, the study found.

"The data also suggests that terrorist organisations may be increasingly recruiting women," says Sarah Desmarais, an associate professor of psychology at North Carolina State and co-author of the paper.

"For example, 34 per cent of the women in our sample were born after 1990, while only 15 per cent of men were born after 1990. Since we were able to control for age at radicalisation, this suggests an increase in women's involvement in terrorist groups," she said.

The research also highlighted different roles for women in terrorist action.

"Women were less likely than men to be involved in planning or carrying out terrorist attacks," Christine Brugh, lead author of a paper on the work and a Ph.D. student at North Carolina State University.

"Only 52 per cent of the women were involved in plots, compared to 76 per cent of men," Brugh said.

"In many ways, the roles of the women in these terrorist groups are consistent with traditional gender norms," Desmarais said.

"The women were more likely to play behind-the-scenes roles aimed at supporting the organisation," Brugh said.

"The fact that these differences are so obvious - but that no one had found them before - suggests that we are just scratching the surface," Brugh said.

The paper, "Gender in the Jihad: Characteristics and Outcomes among Women and Men Involved in Jihadism-Inspired Terrorism," is published in the Journal of Threat Assessment and Management.

The paper was co-authored by Joseph Simons-Rudolph, a teaching assistant professor of psychology at NC State; and Samantha Zottola, a Ph.D. student at NC State.
0Comments
Comments
Add Your Comments
Commenting feature is disabled in your country/region.
Download The Economic Times Business News App for Live Elections News & Results, Latest News in Business, Share Market & More.

Other useful Links


Follow us on


Download et app


Copyright © 2019 Bennett, Coleman & Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. For reprint rights: Times Syndication Service