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    Drones and CCTVs keep check on Spain's tourists

    ET Online|
    ​Surveillance tourism
    1/5

    ​Surveillance tourism

    Surveillance is the watchword at the seaside this summer, with Spanish beaches using drones, cameras and coloured tape to ensure safety for tourists holidaying in the shadow of the virus.

    In pic: A sign showing areas reserved for adults and families stands on a beach as part of new safety measures in Spain.

    AFP
    ​A drone’s din
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    ​A drone’s din

    Over the curve of the bay in the northeastern resort of Lloret de Mar, a drone lazily flies overhead, the eye in the sky keeping a close watch to ensure there's no overcrowding. The aim, says mayor Jaume Dulset, is to "find the balance between people being comfortable and relaxing while ensuring a safe environment."

    AFP
    ​Fighting the virus with tech
    3/5

    ​Fighting the virus with tech

    Always full in summer, its beaches are being partitioned off, with cameras and sensors transmitting real-time information to potential visitors via an app. With more municipal staff to flag up any non-compliance, they are also using drones that can play recorded messages about social distancing should they spot overcrowding.

    AFP
    ​Senior privileges
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    ​Senior privileges

    "Normally we would be full by this point but for now, there are very few people so it's easy to respect the security distance," explains 78-year-old Jose María Quicio. He and his wife Olga, 81, have set up folding chairs a few metres from the shore inside a red cordon roping off space for those over 70.

    AFP
    ​Resorting to safety
    5/5

    ​Resorting to safety

    Many resorts have developed strategies for avoiding a surfeit of sunbathers along Spain's 8,000 kilometres of shoreline -- a refuge for millions of tourists from Spain and beyond. And the measures are manifold: from sensor-controlled access which can be shut off when capacity is reached, to sections parcelled-off for groups, to banning games taking up too much space or involving a lot of people.

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