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Hagibis typhoon: 19 dead as Japan launches major rescue

AP|
Rescue operations
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Rescue operations

Helicopters, boats and thousands of troops were deployed across Japan to rescue people stranded in flooded homes as the death toll from a ferocious typhoon climbed to at least 19 with more than a dozen missing.

Public broadcaster NHK said 14 rivers across the nation had flooded, some spilling out in more than one spot.

AP
Flooding
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Flooding

Aerial footage showed tractors at work trying to control the flooding and several people on a rooftop, with one waving white cloth to get the attention of a helicopter. Nearby was a child's school bag. In another part, rows of Japan's prized bullet trains, parked in a facility, were sitting in a pool of water.

A stretch of Fukushima, in the city of Date, was also flooded with only rooftops of residential homes visible in some areas, and rescuers paddled in boats to get people out. Parts of nearby Miyagi prefecture were also under water.

The Tama River, which runs by Tokyo, overflowed its banks, flooding homes and other buildings in the area.

AP
Risk of mudslides
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Risk of mudslides

Authorities warned of a risk of mudslides. Among the reported deaths were those whose homes were buried in landslides. Other fatalities included people who got swept away by raging rivers.

Boats as well as helicopters were sent to the flooded areas, while rescue crew dug through dirt elsewhere to try to get people out from homes buried by landslides.

Several train service in the Tokyo area resumed early morning, although others were undergoing safety checks and were expected to restart later Sunday.

AP
Govt's assurance
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Govt's assurance

Ruling party politician Fumio Kishida said the government will do its utmost in rescue operations, including making sure that those who moved to shelters were taken care of.

He acknowledged Japan's power grids need to be strengthened so people in disaster areas can rely on timely information.

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