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Gujarat gaushalas now out of land ceiling Act

Gujarat Land Ceiling (Amendment) Bill, 2019, excludes lands being utilised for maintenance of gaushalas from the provisions of the Gujarat Agriculture Land Ceiling Act, 1961.

, ET Bureau|
Oct 08, 2019, 07.48 AM IST
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The Vijay Rupani government in February had introduced amendments, allowing registered public trusts running gaushalas to own more agriculture land than prescribed under the law.
New Delhi: President Ram Nath Kovind has given assent to a Gujarat state bill exempting gaushalas, or cattle sheds, from the land ceiling law, along with three other key state bills.

Gujarat Land Ceiling (Amendment) Bill, 2019, excludes lands being utilised for maintenance of gaushalas from the provisions of the Gujarat Agriculture Land Ceiling Act, 1961.

The state revenue department has been registering cases against gaushalas under the law. Under the land ceiling Act, a person or an institution was required to get a “separate trust registered for lands utilised for maintenance of gaushala”.

The Vijay Rupani government in February had introduced amendments, allowing registered public trusts running gaushalas to own more agriculture land than prescribed under the law.

The President has also sanctioned Tamil Nadu Private Schools (Regulation) Bill, 2018, Tripura Industries (Facilitation) Bill, 2018, and Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement (Tamil Nadu Second Amendment) Bill, 2014. Bills from a state government are received (under Article 200 read with Article 254(2) of the Constitution of India) for consideration and assent of the President under Article 201 of the Constitution, an official said. “State legislations are examined in consultation with central ministries and departments to overcome repugnancy with central laws, if any, deviation from national or central policy, and legal and constitutional validity,” the official told ET.

The Tamil Nadu Right to Fair Compensation Bill had run into controversy after it was originally enacted in 2013. The amendment was ch a l -lenged before the Madras HC, which declared it “illegal”. The HC, in its order dated July 3, 2019, stated: “State must reenact these statutes, in accordance with Article 254(2) of the Constitution of India, and obtain the assent of the President…” The second bill from Tamil Nadu aims to regulate admissions, collection of fees, conduct of examinations and to ensure basic minimum standards in private schools. It empowers the government to impose penalty if any student is prevented from appearing for the board examination due to poor academic performance or for any other unhealthy reason.
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