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    Sports is the next frontier for Dolby: Mahesh Sundaram, VP, APAC, Dolby Laboratories

    Synopsis

    We have been capturing sound for events like Olympics and soccer world cup. What is important in sports is to have mikes placed at the right place on field.

    Mahesh Sundaram, VP, APAC, Dolby Laboratories was recently in India. He spoke to ET about the brands' plans. Excerpts:

    How is Dolby doing in India?

    It's been good so far. For a long time we were only in sound recording, now movies are equally important. Dum Maaro Dum is the latest Bollywood movie to be shot in 7.1 technology.

    We know about Dolby's association with movies. Are there any new frontiers you seek?

    We have tied up with DTH players like like Airtel, Tata Sky, Sun, Reliance TV and now even TV shows are in Dolby instead of Surround sound. We are also looking at personal technology, mobile and online medium. We are also working with Indian brands like HCL & Wipro to put sound in their devices. In retail stores we have setup demo zones to demonstrate sound.

    What happens in these demo zones?

    It is important today to start the education process. So we are entering large format stores and extending training to shops. We have 300 people deployed at retail end to demonstrate sound. We want to show consumers the entire picture. How sound comes from a home theatre, TV, etc.

    What are Dobly's plans for TV?

    A lot of content is today consumed on TV. TV commercials have been using our technology for a long time now. We are part of event like Oscars and Grammy which has a large TV audience. Sports are a highly desirable area for capturing sound for TV.

    Is sports a new area for Dolby?

    We have been capturing sound for events like Olympics and soccer world cup. What is important in sports is to have mikes placed at the right place on field. The sounds are then mixed in the OB vans before broadcast. It's a lot different and difficult than making sound in a studio.
    The Economic Times